DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, LICENSING, & REGULATION


OFFICE OF SECRETARY

500 North Calvert St.
Baltimore, MD 21202 - 3651

Appointed by the Governor with Senate advice and consent, the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation heads the Department (Code Business Regulation Article, sec. 2-102). The Secretary serves on the Governor's Executive Council; the Asbestos Oversight Committee; the Maryland Commission on Manufacturing Competitiveness; the Interdepartmental Advisory Committee for Minority Affairs; the Maryland Advisory Council for New Americans; the Governor's Interagency Council for the Nonprofit Sector; the State Board of Pilots; the Smart Codes Strategy Group (steering committee); the Western Maryland Economic Development Task Force; and the Governor's Work Force Investment Board.

The Department's four divisions report directly to the Secretary. They are responsible for Administration; Employment and Training; Labor and Industry; and Regulatory Policy and Programs.

BOARD OF APPEALS

1100 North Eutaw St.
Baltimore, MD 21201

The Board of Appeals, formerly known as the Unemployment Insurance Board of Appeals, hears and decides appeals on the determinations of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation concerning claims for unemployment insurance benefits. It also hears appeals that arise under the tax provisions of the Unemployment Insurance Law and other matters requiring appellate adjudication.

With the approval of the Governor, the Board's three members are appointed to six-year terms by the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation (Code Labor and Employment Article, secs. 8-501 through 8-512).

LOWER APPEALS DIVISION
Under the jurisdiction of the Board of Appeals is the Lower Appeals Division. The Division holds hearings on claimants' or employers' appeals from unemployment insurance claims determinations of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation. Claimants may appeal determinations disqualifying them for benefits, and employers may appeal determinations allowing benefits. These hearings are conducted by hearing examiners, designated by the Board of Appeals. Any aggrieved party may appeal a decision of a hearing examiner to the Board of Appeals. Final appellate recourse is to the courts of Maryland.


ADMINISTRATION

1100 North Eutaw St., Room 616
Baltimore, MD 21201

The Assistant Secretary for Administration oversees the Department's administrative functions. These include financial planning; expenditure control; budget preparation; grants management; procurement processing; personnel management; fair employment practices; substance abuse screening; data processing; general services; facilities maintenance and security; inventory control; and risk management. The Assistant Secretary also serves as liaison with other State agencies, the legislature, the gubernatorial staff, and the federal government.

Under the Assistant Secretary are five offices: Continuous Quality Improvement; General Services; Legislative Services; Personnel and Training; and Public Information.


DIVISION OF EMPLOYMENT & TRAINING

1100 North Eutaw St., Room 600
Baltimore, MD 21201

The Division of Employment and Training originated in 1937 as the Department of Employment Security (Chapter 314, Acts of 1937). The Department reformed in 1970 as the Department of Employment and Social Services (Chapter 96, Acts of 1970). In 1975, it became the Department of Human Resources (Chapter 382, Acts of 1975). The Department's Employment Security Administration functioned until 1983 when the Department of Employment and Training was created as a principal executive department (Chapter 64, Acts of 1983). In 1987, the Department of Employment and Training was abolished and its functions were assigned to the Division of Employment and Training in the Department of Economic and Employment Development (Chapter 311, Acts of 1987). The Division transferred in 1995 to the Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation (Chapter 120, Acts of 1995).

Maryland public and private resources for employment and job training are coordinated by the Division (Code Labor and Employment Article, secs. 11-101 through 11-408).

Within the Division are five offices: Employment Services; Employment Training; Information Technology; Labor Market Analysis and Information; and Unemployment Insurance. The Division also administers local offices of employment and training in each county and Baltimore City.

OFFICE OF EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

1100 North Eutaw St., Room 209
Baltimore, MD 21201

Known as the Maryland Job Service, the Office of Employment Services provides a statewide public labor exchange to match employers with job seekers. The Office also carries out programs for Alien Registration, America's Job Bank, Statewide Disabled Veterans Outreach, Local Veterans Employment Representative, Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers, Tax Credit, and Unemployment Insurance Work Test.

Functions of the Office of Employment Services date to 1902, when the Chief of the Bureau of Industrial Statistics was instructed to organize and operate a free State employment agency (Chapter 365, Acts of 1902). That responsibility in 1916 transferred to the State Board of Labor and Statistics with the additional duty of investigating causes of unemployment and possible solutions (Chapter 406, Acts of 1916). Since 1936, the State's employment service also has administered the unemployment insurance law.

Created in 1937, the Department of Employment Security included the Employment Service Division. The Division continued under the Department of Employment and Social Services, created in 1970; and under the Employment Security Administration of the Department of Human Resources, formed in 1975. When the Department of Employment and Training was established in 1983, the Division became the Maryland Job Service under the Department's Job Training and Placement Division. In 1987, the Maryland Job Service became part of the Division of Employment and Training within the Department of Economic and Employment Development. In 1995, the Office of Employment Services moved with the Division of Employment and Training to the Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation.

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS TEAM
1100 North Eutaw St.
Baltimore, MD 21201

The Management Information Systems Team began as Job Bank Central in 1975. Renamed Central Processing in 1982, it reorganized under its present name in 1987. The Team directs the statewide data bank which serves both employers and job seekers. The Team also designs automation programs for communication among employers, those seeking work, and the Maryland Job Service.

MANAGEMENT SUPPORT & SPECIAL PROGRAMS TEAM
In December 1994, the Management Support and Special Programs Team formed. The Team markets employment services to employers and job seekers, plans the budget, and helps all teams with budget administration. The Team also administers special programs, such as the Alien Labor Certification Program, the Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Program, and the Tax Credit Program.

OPERATIONS TEAM
The Operations Team provides support and direction to all Maryland Job Service offices. It also supports the State's economic community through innovations in services to employers and job seekers.

OFFICE OF EMPLOYMENT TRAINING

1100 North Eutaw St.
Baltimore, MD 21201

In 1976, the Office of Employment Training was established as the State Manpower Planning Office within the Department of Human Resources. The Office reorganized in 1979 as the Training and Employment Office under the Community Programs Administration. In 1983, the Office became the Job Training and Placement Administration under the Department of Employment and Training, and was renamed the Office of Employment Training under the Division of Employment and Training in 1987.

The Office administers programs authorized by the federal Job Training Partnership Act. These include employment and training for economically disadvantaged adults and youth, and dislocated workers. Programs encompass vocational training, counseling, and on-the-job training, as well as summer employment and training for youth. Some programs are run by local service delivery areas and private industry councils.

In accordance with federal law, the Governor designated twelve local service delivery areas, which consist of a county or group of counties. In each, a private industry council decides what employment and training services are needed. Appointed by local government, the councils represent State and local government, community colleges, and private industry.

The Office also supports the Department's management of the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Program. Created by the federal Family Support Act, the Program offers employment training, education, employment support services, and job placement to recipients of public assistance. The Office works with local private industry councils which conduct the Program with other local agencies of social services, education, and economic development.

OFFICE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

1100 North Eutaw St., Room 303
Baltimore, MD 21201

In 1992, the Office of Information Technology formed in the Division of Employment and Training. The Office has two units: Technical Services and Operations; and Systems Development.

OFFICE OF LABOR MARKET ANALYSIS & INFORMATION

1100 North Eutaw St., Room 601
Baltimore, MD 21201

The Office of Labor Market Analysis and Information organized as Research and Analysis in the Department of Employment Security by 1958. In 1987, the Office received its present name.

A comprehensive labor market information system is developed and maintained by the Office. The system includes data on employment, unemployment, and other factors relating to labor supply and demand. It also covers trends in industrial and occupational structure, wage levels, and the demographics of the labor force. This information aids employers, job seekers, and administrators, managers, and planners concerned with labor market conditions and trends. Federally funded, the Office works cooperatively on surveys and reporting systems with the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor.

OFFICE OF UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE

1100 North Eutaw St., Room 501
Baltimore, MD 21201

In December 1936 with the enactment of Maryland's Unemployment Compensation Law, the Office of Unemployment Insurance began as the Unemployment Compensation Board. In 1937, the Board was superseded by the Department of Employment Security (Chapter 314, Acts of 1937). The Department's Unemployment Insurance Division administered the unemployment insurance law until 1970. In that year, the Department reorganized as the Department of Employment and Social Services (Chapter 96, Acts of 1970). That department's Employment Security Administration carried on administrative duties and in 1975 was renamed the Unemployment Insurance Division of the Department of Human Resources (Chapter 382, Acts of 1975). In 1983, the Division was transferred to the Department of Employment and Training and renamed the Unemployment Insurance Administration. As the Office of Unemployment Insurance, it became part of the Department of Economic and Employment Development in 1987 (Chapter 311, Acts of 1987). It transferred in 1995 to the Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation (Chapter 120, Acts of 1995).

The Office supervises the Unemployment Insurance Program carried out by local offices (Code Labor and Employment Article, secs. 8-101 through 8-1505). In accordance with the Maryland Unemployment Insurance Law, the Office collects contributions from employers covered by the Law, collects quarterly wage information on covered employees, determines weekly benefits and eligibility in accordance with this wage information, and issues benefit checks to eligible claimants. It reviews benefit payments, recovers any improperly made, and pays benefits to individuals who formerly worked in Maryland but now reside in other states. As provided by reciprocal interstate agreement, the Office also collects Maryland residents' claims against employers in other states.

Using an experience rating system, the Unemployment Insurance Law allows a reduced contribution rate for employers who maintain steady employment. All funds collected under the Law are deposited with the U.S. Treasury for the credit of the Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund of Maryland and may be used only to pay benefits.

BENEFITS & SPECIAL PROGRAMS SECTION
The Benefits and Special Programs Section determines claimants' eligibility for unemployment insurance benefits. The Section administers the receipt and processing of claims, adjudication of ineligible claims, and fraud detection and prosecution. The Section also oversees interstate combined wage and federal unemployment benefit programs.

CONTRIBUTIONS SECTION
Employer tax accounts are established by the Contributions Section which assigns rates, charges benefits, and collects taxes on each account. The Section also collects all delinquent accounts and maintains the Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund.

INTERNAL ANALYSIS SECTION
The Internal Analysis Section administers benefits and revenue quality control; benefits payment control; internal security and program integrity; and management and analysis for the Unemployment Insurance Program. The Section also coordinates the agency's responses to all audits performed by outside auditors. It assigns and tracks corrective action to ensure that deficiencies are remedied. Each year, it coordinates and directs statewide the Unemployment Insurance Quality Appraisal (federally mandated) to ensure continued funding of the Unemployment Insurance Program.


DIVISION OF LABOR & INDUSTRY

1100 North Eutaw St.
Baltimore, MD 21201

Established in 1884 as the Bureau of Statistics and Information, the Division of Labor and Industry is one of the oldest governmental agencies in this field in the United States, antedating the U.S. Department of Labor by one year (Chapter 211, Acts of 1884). After 1892, the Department was known as the Industrial Bureau. A reorganization in 1916 renamed it the State Board of Labor and Statistics with enforcement powers for all factory acts. Further reformed in 1939 (Chapter 747, Acts of 1939), the Board in 1945 became the Department of Labor and Industry (Chapter 938, Acts of 1945). It adopted its present name in 1970 (Chapter 402, Acts of 1970).

The Division of Labor and Industry enforces laws and regulations affecting workers and employers. Protection for workers is provided by the Division which sets safety standards and promotes harmony between employers and employees. The Division also protects the public by inspecting railroads, boilers, elevators, and amusement rides.

The Commissioner of Labor and Industry is appointed by the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation with the approval of the Governor and holds office at the pleasure of the Secretary.

Five sections comprise the Division: Apprenticeship and Training; Employment Standards Service; Occupational Safety and Health; Prevailing Wage; and Safety Inspection. Authorization for the Division continues until July 1, 2004 (Code Labor and Employment Article, secs. 2-101 through 2-109).

APPRENTICESHIP & TRAINING

The Office of Apprenticeship and Training was created in 1991 by the Department of Economic and Employment Development, and became the Apprenticeship Program in 1993. In 1995, it transferred to the Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation (Chapter 120, Acts of 1995).

Under direction of the Apprenticeship and Training Council, the Apprenticeship and Training Program registers, certifies, and monitors skilled, craft, trade and technical apprenticeship programs statewide. The Director of Apprenticeship and Training is appointed by the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation (Code Labor and Employment Article, secs. 11-401 through 11-408).

EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS SERVICE

In 1965, the Employment Standards Service was formed as the Labor Standards Division. The Service administers laws governing child labor, employment agencies, and wage payment and collections. The Service also oversees the licensing and certification required by these statutes. In response to specific complaints, the Service investigates and resolves claims by employees of violations of these laws.

The Service is responsible for protective labor laws concerned with children. The Child Labor Law specifies the conditions under which minors (aged 14 to 17) may be employed. The law requires employers to acquire a work permit for each youth hired (Code Labor and Employment Article, secs. 3-201 through 3-216).

Employment agencies in the State which charge applicants a fee are licensed and regulated by the Service (Code Business Regulation Article, secs. 9-101 through 9-601).

Under the Maryland Wage Payment and Collection Law, the Service is empowered to collect wages that are due an employee and have not been paid (Code Labor and Employment Article, secs. 3-501 through 3-509).

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY & HEALTH

The Maryland Occupational Safety and Health Program enforces the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration program in Maryland (with the exception of maritime industries and federal employment). The Program requires that each employer provide a safe and healthful workplace by complying with occupational safety and health regulations and preventing injuries and illnesses. To that end, the Program inspects workplaces and, when violations are found, issues citations and assesses penalties. It also offers free educational and training programs and consultation surveys (Code Labor and Employment Article, secs. 5-101 through 5-901).

Maryland's concern for safety and health in the workplace dates to 1884 when the Bureau of Statistics and Information formed. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1973 reorganized Maryland safety programs and enforcement authorities into a single State occupational safety and health program (Chapter 59, Acts of 1973).

PREVAILING WAGE

The Prevailing Wage Unit began in 1969. The Unit determines the prevailing hourly rate of wages for the same or similar work performed in a locality by various kinds of workers and apprentices required to execute a State-funded construction contract. The Unit also audits payrolls submitted by contractors and conducts on-site inspections to ensure that proper wages are being paid for the work performed (Code State Finance and Procurement Article, secs. 17-201 through 17-226).

SAFETY INSPECTION

Safety Inspection oversees safety programs for amusement rides, elevators, boilers and pressure vessels, and railroad track equipment and operations. Oversight covers critical safety inspections of equipment which, if not installed and maintained properly, can pose hazards to the public.

AMUSEMENT RIDE & ELEVATOR SAFETY INSPECTION
Enacted in 1976, the Amusement Ride Safety Law provides an inspection and enforcement program to ensure the safety of the public in the use of amusement rides and attractions (Chapter 844, Acts of 1976). The Commissioner of Labor and Industry administers and enforces this law, which covers amusement rides and attractions erected permanently or temporarily at carnivals, fairs, and amusement parks (Code Business Regulation Article, secs. 3-101 through 3-601).

The Commissioner of Labor and Industry is responsible for the inspection and certification of elevators, dumbwaiters, escalators, and moving walks throughout Maryland (Code 1957, Art. 89, sec. 49B). Under the Elevator Safety Inspection Program, inspections are conducted in accordance with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators.

BOILER & PRESSURE VESSEL SAFETY INSPECTION
The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Safety Inspection unit inspects boilers and pressure vessels used in commercial establishments, places of public gathering, and apartment buildings with six or more units (Code 1957, Art. 48, secs. 167-180A). Any boiler or pressure vessel to be installed in Maryland must be built to a standardized nationwide construction code (American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code). Through periodic inspections and close monitoring of all repair work, the unit ensures the safe operation of boilers and pressure vessels.

RAILROAD SAFETY & HEALTH
Formed in 1980, the Railroad Safety and Health Program conducts inspections to ensure enforcement of State and federal railroad safety requirements (Chapter 834, Acts of 1980). The Program also investigates railroad-related accidents and incidents and responds to citizen complaints involving railroad companies operating in Maryland (Code 1957, Art. 89, secs. 82-99).


REGULATORY POLICY & PROGRAMS

500 North Calvert St.
Baltimore, MD 21201

In 1995, Regulatory Policy and Programs organized to oversee three divisions: Financial Regulation; Occupational and Professional Licensing; and Racing.


DIVISION OF FINANCIAL REGULATION

500 North Calvert St., Room 402
Baltimore, MD 21201

Functions of the Division of Financial Regulation began in 1980. The Division regulates banking and consumer credit. It supervises the operation of banks, credit unions, consumer loan companies, sales finance companies, mortgage companies, and collection agencies. The Commissioner of Financial Regulation is appointed by the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation with the approval of the Governor and Senate advice and consent (Chapter 326, Acts of 1996; Code Financial Institutions Article, secs. 2-101 through 2-112).

Appointed by the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation with the approval of the Governor, the Commissioner of Financial Regulation holds office at the pleasure of the Secretary (Code Financial Institutions Article, sec. 2-401).

BANK SUPERVISION
In Maryland, bank supervision started when the office of the State Bank Commissioner was created in 1910 (Chapter 219, Acts of 1910). Functions of that office became the responsibility of the Commissioner of Financial Regulation in 1996.

The Commissioner's office has general supervision over all banking institutions in the State, except national banks. It must examine each institution at least once every 18 months, at such other times as the Commissioner deems expedient, and at any time upon request of the board of directors of the institution. These examinations may be made in conjunction with federal regulatory agencies. The office of the Commissioner of Financial Regulation also handles consumer complaints against institutions under its jurisdiction.

Banks. Every bank, trust company, and mutual savings bank is required to submit under oath to the Commissioner of Financial Regulation at least two reports in each calendar year. The reports must exhibit in detail the resources and liabilities of the institution.

All new State banking institutions must incorporate under the supervision of the Commissioner of Financial Regulation and must obtain a certificate before opening for business. The Commissioner must approve all applications for a branch office made by a State bank, trust company, or mutual savings bank, and must pass upon all amendments to their charters, as well as the establishment of affiliates and subsidiaries. Mergers or voluntary liquidations and acquisitions of State-chartered banks also must be approved by the Commissioner (Code Financial Institutions Article, secs. 2-101 through 5-1007).

Credit Unions. The Commissioner of Financial Regulation supervises all State-chartered credit unions and is required to examine these institutions at least once each year. All credit unions must report annually to the Commissioner (Code Financial Institutions Article, secs. 6-101 through 6-704). Under the Credit Union Law, any seven or more Maryland residents sharing common occupational, residential or social experiences or characteristics may act as incorporators to form a credit union and apply to the Commissioner of Financial Regulation for permission to organize.

State-chartered credit unions may be insured by the National Credit Union Administration or the Credit Union Insurance Corporation (Chapter 658, Acts of 1973). The Commissioner of Financial Regulation must certify to the Corporation a credit union's financial affairs, solvency, management, and directorship as being approved for insurance of its members' shares and deposit accounts (Code Financial Institutions Article, secs. 7-101 through 7-117).

Tax-Exempt Financial Institutions. Eligible tax-exempt financial institutions may apply to the Commissioner of Financial Regulation to be supervised and examined by the Commissioner (Code Financial Institutions Article, sec. 12-701). These institutions must be nonstock corporations exempt from taxes under the Internal Revenue Code (sec. 501 (c)(3)), as amended; and financial institutions engaged solely in extending credit and loans to socially or economically disadvantaged businesses for their business and commercial development. In addition, a majority and all controlling members of such financial institutions must be persons designated and approved by any banking institution or national banking association.

Sellers of Money Orders and Travelers' Checks. The Sellers of Money Orders and Travelers' Checks Law requires the Commissioner of Financial Regulation to supervise and regulate persons issuing checks, drafts, and money orders for a fee. Persons who wish to transact such business in Maryland must procure an annual license from the Commissioner. All such persons must report periodically to the Commissioner on agent charges, financial structure, and other conditions relative to their functions under the Law (Code Financial Institutions Article, secs. 12-401 through 12-424).

CONSUMER CREDIT REGULATION
In Maryland, regulation of consumer credit began in 1939 under jurisdiction of the Bank Commissioner (Chapter 741, Acts of 1939). It reformed under the Administrator of Loan Laws in 1941 (Chapter 289, Acts of 1941). In 1970, the office was renamed Commissioner of Small Loans and, in 1974, Commissioner of Consumer Credit (Chapter 402, Acts of 1970; Chapter 457, Acts of 1974). In 1996, these responsibilities were assigned to the Commissioner of Financial Regulation.

The Commissioner of Financial Regulation licenses, registers, and regulates consumer loan companies, sales finance companies, retail credit card financing companies, installment loan lenders, debt collectors, credit grantors, and mortgage brokers, lenders, and servicers. In addition, the Commissioner administers the Maryland Credit Services Businesses Act, the Consumer Credit Reporting Agencies Law, the Maryland Equal Credit Opportunity Act, and the Denial of Credit Disclosure Act. The Commissioner has co-jurisdictional authority on unfair or deceptive trade practices and generally enforces the consumer protection laws governing credit. To discover violations of the law, the office regularly examines and investigates these companies. The office also maintains a complaint section which answers inquiries and investigates complaints from consumers and the business community regarding irregularities or violations.

Upon the filing of a written letter of complaint, the Commissioner may investigate, and (after a formal hearing) issue cease and desist orders, and award restitution. The Commissioner also may suspend or revoke a license upon finding an illegal activity (Code Financial Institutions Article, secs. 11-101 through 11-524; Commercial Law Article, secs. 12-514, 12-631, 12-916, 12-1016, 14-1218, 14-1706, 14-1911).


DIVISION OF OCCUPATIONAL & PROFESSIONAL LICENSING

500 North Calvert St.
Baltimore, MD 21201

Standards of performance for several vocations are enforced by the Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing. Created in 1980, the Division supervises a variety of specialized occupations, including accountants, architects, barbers, cosmetologists, engineers, home improvement contractors, and real estate brokers. The Division also regulates the sports of boxing and wrestling and oversees cemeteries as well.

The Division oversees and coordinates fourteen boards, four commissions, one oversight office, and an investigative unit. The Commissioner plans and directs the daily administrative, fiscal and technical functions of these agencies and administers all aspects of their licensing laws.

STATE BOARD OF ARCHITECTS

As the Board of Examiners and Registration of Architects, the State Board of Architects originated in 1935 (Chapter 309, Acts of 1935). It was renamed the Maryland Architectural Registration Board in 1968 (Chapter 463, Acts of 1968). In 1989, the Board received its present name (Chapter 3, Acts of 1989). The Board decides all matters pertaining to the registration of architects in Maryland. All persons, corporations, or partnerships seeking to practice architecture in the State must submit their qualifications to the Board or pass its examination before being registered and licensed to practice.

The Governor appoints the Board's seven members to five-year terms with the advice of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation and Senate advice and consent. The Governor also names the chair. Authorization for the Board continues until July 1, 2003 (Code Business Occupations and Professions Article, secs. 3-101 through 3-701).

STATE ATHLETIC COMMISSION

In 1920, the State Athletic Commission formed (Chapter 710, Acts of 1920). The Commission supervises all professional boxing, kick-boxing, sparring and wrestling matches and exhibitions held in Maryland. It enacts and enforces rules to govern such bouts. It licenses all corporations, associations, or persons sponsoring such bouts, and all referees, managers, seconds, and participants. From all sponsors of boxing and wrestling matches, the Commission collects a fee equal to ten percent of the gross gate receipts and also ten percent of the sale of radio, television or motion picture rights to boxing and wrestling events. The fees are deposited with the Comptroller of Maryland as State general funds.

The Commission's five members are appointed to six-year terms by the Governor with the advice of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation. Authorization for the Commission continues until July 1, 2011 (Code Business Regulation Article, secs. 4-201 through 4-208).

STATE BOARD OF BARBERS

The State Board of Barbers began in 1904 as the Board of Barber Examiners (Chapter 226, Acts of 1904). The Board received its present name in 1989 (Chapter 3, Acts of 1989). The Board examines, licenses, and regulates all persons engaged in barbering services in the State. With the approval of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation, the Board may appoint inspectors to inspect shops and schools. The Board also has the power to make rules and regulations.

The Board has seven members. They are appointed to five-year terms by the Governor with the advice of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation. The Governor names the president, secretary, and treasurer. Authorization for the Board continues until July 1, 2011 (Code Business Occupations and Professions Article, secs. 4-101 through 4-701).

OFFICE OF CEMETERY OVERSIGHT

The Office of Cemetery Oversight was created within the Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation in 1997 (Chapter 675, Acts of 1997). The Office licenses and monitors individuals, partnerships, corporations, and limited liability companies that provide burial goods and grounds in Maryland.

With the Governor's approval, the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation appoints the Director (Code Business Regulation Article, secs. 5-201 through 5-206).

STATE BOARD OF COSMETOLOGISTS

The State Board of Cosmetologists originated in 1935 as the Board of Hairdressers and Beauty Culturists (Chapter 282, Acts of 1935). It received its present name in 1961 (Chapter 278, Acts of 1961). The Board examines, licenses, and regulates all persons engaged in the practice of beauty culture within Maryland. Throughout the State, the Board inspects beauty salons and schools, and is authorized to make rules and regulations governing cosmetologists.

The Board is composed of seven members appointed to three-year terms by the Governor with the advice of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation. Authorization for the Board continues until July 1, 2011 (Code Business Occupations and Professions Article, secs. 5-101 through 5-702).

STATE BOARD OF DOCKING MASTERS

The State Board of Docking Masters will be formed effective October 1, 2000 (Chapter 509, Acts of 2000).

STATE BOARD OF MASTER ELECTRICIANS

In 1984, the State Board of Master Electricians was created as the Maryland Statewide Electrical Licensing Board (Chapter 731, Acts of 1984). The Board adopted its present name in 1988 (Chapter 648, Acts of 1988). Previously, a Board of Electrical Examiners and Supervisors, created in 1906, was incorporated into the Department of Licensing and Regulation in 1970, but its scope was limited to Baltimore City (Chapter 244, Acts of 1906; Chapter 402, Acts of 1970). The State Board of Master Electricians examines and licenses master electricians desiring to work on a statewide or multi-county basis in Maryland.

With Senate advice and consent, the Governor appoints the Board's nine members to three-year terms (Code Business Occupations and Professions Article, secs. 6-101 through 6-702).

BOARD OF EXAMINING ENGINEERS

The Board of Examining Engineers dates to 1892 (Chapter 448, Acts of 1892). The Board examines applicants for certificates of proficiency to operate stationary or portable engines in Baltimore City. Certificates must be renewed biennially. Industries and places of business where licensed engineers are employed may be inspected by the Board to ensure compliance with the law.

The Governor appoints the Board's five members with the advice of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation. Members serve three-year terms (Public Local Laws of Baltimore City, 1969, Art. 4, secs. 1-6).

STATE BOARD FOR PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS

In 1939, the State Board for Professional Engineers was established as the State Board of Registration for Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors (Chapter 752, Acts of 1939). It was redesignated as the State Board of Registration for Professional Engineers in 1977 (Chapter 763, Acts of 1977). The Board received its present name in 1989 (Chapter 3, Acts of 1989). Professional engineers wishing to practice in Maryland must apply to the Board for a license. Upon application, they must furnish evidence of their experience and training.

Provisions of the registration law are enforced by the Board which restrains any violation of it. The Board can investigate charges as well as hear complaints of violations, subpoena witnesses, require the submission of documents or other data, and apply for relief by injunction.

The Board has seven members. They are appointed to five-year terms by the Governor with Senate advice and consent and the advice of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation. Authorization for the Board continues until July 1, 2003 (Code Business Occupations and Professions Article, secs. 14-101 through 14-602).

STATE BOARD OF FORESTERS

The State Board of Foresters began in 1972 as the State Board of Registration for Foresters (Chapter 638, Acts of 1972). It was assigned to the Department of Licensing and Regulation in 1974 and received its present name in 1989 (Chapter 4, Acts of the Special Session of 1973; Chapter 3, Acts of 1989). The Board licenses persons practicing forestry in Maryland.

With Senate advice and consent, the Governor appoints the Board's seven members to five-year terms. Authorization for the Board continues until July 1, 2004 (Code Business Occupations and Professions Article, secs. 7-101 through 7-602).

STATE BOARD OF HEATING, VENTILATION, AIR-CONDITIONING, & REFRIGERATION CONTRACTORS

The State Board of Heating, Ventilation, Air-Conditioning, and Refrigeration Contractors was created in 1992 (Chapter 649, Acts of 1992, effective January 1, 1993). The Board licenses persons who provide or assist in providing heating, ventilation, air-conditioning and refrigeration in Maryland.

The Governor appoints the Board's seven members with the advice of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation and Senate advice and consent. Members serve three-year terms. The Governor designates the chair (Code Business Regulation Article, secs. 9A-101 through 9A-602).

MARYLAND HOME IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION

In 1962, the Maryland Home Improvement Commission was established (Chapter 133, Acts of 1962). The Commission licenses and regulates contractors and salespersons in the home improvement industry. It investigates complaints filed by home owners against home improvement contractors, and takes administrative or legal action against violators of the law.

The Commission's seven members are appointed to four-year terms by the Governor with the advice of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation. The Governor names the chair with the advice of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation. Authorization for the Commission continues until October 1, 2012 (Code Business Regulation Article, secs. 8-101 through 8-702).

STATE BOARD OF CERTIFIED INTERIOR DESIGNERS

The State Board of Certified Interior Designers formed in 1991 (Chapter 663, Acts of 1991). The Board certifies persons who provide interior design services, renews certificates, and may revoke a certificate or reprimand a certificate holder. The Board is required to adopt a code of ethics for certified interior designers and annually publish a list of those certified and those whose certificates have been suspended or revoked in the prior three years.

The Board's seven members are appointed to three-year terms by the Governor with the advice of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation and Senate advice and consent. Authorization for the Board continues until July 1, 2004 (Code Business Occupations and Professions Article, secs. 8-101 through 8-602).

STATE BOARD FOR PROFESSIONAL LAND SURVEYORS

In 1939, the State Board for Professional Land Surveyors was created (Chapter 752, Acts of 1939). It reorganized in 1977 as the State Board of Registration for Professional Land Surveyors (Chapter 763, Acts of 1977). The Board was renamed the State Board for Professional Land Surveyors in 1989 (Chapter 3, Acts of 1989).

All persons seeking to practice surveying in Maryland must submit their qualifications to the Board or pass its examination before receiving a certificate of registration to practice. Through the cooperation of local chapters of the surveying fraternities, the Board seeks to secure voluntary compliance with the law and maintain the ethical standards of the profession. The Board also enforces the provisions of the registration law and restrains any violations of it. The Board can investigate charges, as well as hear complaints of violations, subpoena witnesses and documents or other pertinent data, and apply for relief by injunction.

The Board is a member of the Maryland Society of Professional Land Surveyors, which aids in the reciprocal licensing of surveyors and seeks to promote uniform standards of licensing in all states.

With the advice of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation, the Governor appoints the Board's six members to five-year terms. The Governor names the chair. Authorization for the Board continues until July 1, 2003 (Code Business Occupations and Professions Article, secs. 15-101 through 15-702).

STATE BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

In 1971, the State Board of Examiners of Landscape Architects started within the Department of Natural Resources as the Maryland Board of Examiners of Landscape Architects (Chapter 645, Acts of 1971). The Board became part of the Department of Licensing and Regulation in 1973 (Chapter 4, Acts of Special Session of 1973) and received its present name in 1989 (Chapter 3, Acts of 1989). The Board licenses landscape architects who desire to practice in Maryland. It holds examinations at least once a year and determines who may be exempt from the provisions of the law.

The Board comprises five members. They are appointed to three-year terms by the Governor upon the recommendation of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation and with Senate advice and consent. Authorization for the Board continues until July 1, 2003 (Code Business Occupations and Professions Article, secs. 9-101 through 9-702).

STATE BOARD OF PILOTS

In Maryland, boat pilots were regulated first in 1787, when a board was formed to examine the qualifications of those who practiced the "art of piloting in Chesapeake bay and the rivers thereof" (Chapter 26, Acts of 1787). Numerous boards were appointed thereafter to examine, license, and set fees. The State Board of Pilots was created as the Board of Examiners of Maryland Pilots in 1969 to license pilots (Chapter 575, Acts of 1969). The Board received its present name in 1989 (Chapter 3, Acts of 1989). The Board establishes rules and regulations to ensure the safety of pilotage services. In 1984, the responsibility for setting pilotage fees and charges was transferred to the Public Service Commission (Chapter 727, Acts of 1984).

The Board consists of nine members appointed for two-year terms by the Governor. The Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation (or designee) serves ex officio and the eight remaining members are appointed with the Secretary's advice. The Governor names the chair. Authorization for the Board continues until July 1, 2003 (Code Business Occupations and Professions Article, secs. 11-101 through 11-802).

STATE BOARD OF PLUMBING

The first board for examining and licensing plumbers in Maryland was established in 1886 (Chapter 439, Acts of 1886). Its jurisdiction was limited to Baltimore City. The State Board of Commissioners of Practical Plumbing was created with statewide jurisdiction in 1910 (Chapter 436, Acts of 1910). In 1988, it was renamed the State Board of Plumbing (Chapter 647, Acts of 1988). The Board regulates the plumbing trade in Maryland. It examines and certifies journeymen and master plumbers. Periodically, the Board also publishes the State Plumbing Code.

The Board has nine members. They are appointed to three-year terms by the Governor with the advice of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation and Senate advice and consent. The Governor names the chair. Authorization for the Board continues until July 1, 2003 (Code Business Occupations and Professions Article, secs. 12-101 through 12-702).

STATE BOARD OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTANCY

The State Board of Public Accountancy originated in 1900 as the Board of Examiners of Public Accountants (Chapter 719, Acts of 1900). In 1961, the Board was renamed the Maryland State Board of Public Accountancy (Chapter 819, Acts of 1961). It became the State Board of Public Accountancy in 1989 (Chapter 3, Acts of 1989).

Subject to the authority of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation, the Board examines applicants for certificates as certified public accountants; judges applications by certified public accountants of other states for reciprocal certificates; and enrolls certified public accountants, corporations, and partnerships engaging in certified public accounting services. Examinations are held each May and November. The Board issues certificates to those who pass the examinations or whose applications for reciprocal certificates are approved. For specified causes, the Board may revoke or suspend any such certificate, registration, or enrollment after written notice to the holder and reasonable opportunity for a hearing. In 1970, the General Assembly established minimum educational requirements for applicants and gave the Board jurisdiction over professional ethics.

Consisting of seven members, the Board is appointed to three-year terms by the Governor with the advice of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation. Authorization for the Board continues until July 1, 2004 (Code Business Occupations and Professions Article, secs. 2-101 through 2-702).

STATE REAL ESTATE COMMISSION

The Real Estate Commission of Maryland was constituted in 1939 to license all real estate brokers and salespersons doing business in Maryland (Chapter 351, Acts of 1939). In 1988, the Commission was renamed the State Real Estate Commission (Chapter 563, Acts of 1988). The Commission adopts regulations for licensing real estate brokers and salespersons, formulates a code of ethics for the business of real estate, and sets standards for hearings conducted by itself or the Real Estate Hearing Board. Each applicant for a real estate salesperson's or broker's license must complete courses relating to the principles of real estate in order to qualify for examination.

The Commission may revoke, refuse, or suspend a license and reprimand or fine a person up to $2,000 per violation for unethical conduct or violation of the real estate laws. Since 1971, the Commission has administered the Real Estate Guaranty Fund of Maryland (Chapter 648, Acts of 1971). The Fund, in essence, bonds all licensees.

Nine members comprise the Commission. They are appointed to four-year terms by the Governor with the advice of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation and Senate advice and consent. Authorization for the Commission continues until July 1, 2002 (Code Business Occupations and Professions Article, secs. 17-101 through 17-702).

STATE COMMISSION OF REAL ESTATE APPRAISERS

The State Commission of Real Estate Appraisers was created in 1990 to license real estate appraisers (Chapter 594, Acts of 1990). Any person who wishes to provide real estate appraisal services in Maryland must be licensed by the Commission.

The Commission's nine members are appointed to three-year terms by the Governor with the advice of the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation and Senate advice and consent. Nominated by the Commission, the Executive Director is appointed by the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation. Authorization for the Commission continues until July 1, 2003 (Code Business Occupations and Professions Article, secs. 16-101 through 16-802).

LICENSURE OF SECONDHAND PRECIOUS METAL OBJECT DEALERS & PAWNBROKERS

In 1981, the Secretary of Licensing and Regulation was authorized to license every individual dealer in secondhand precious metals and gems in the State (Chapter 436, Acts of 1981). This licensure was extended in 1982 to cover pawnbrokers in those jurisdictions not having local licenses. Since 1995, the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation has been responsible for these duties (Code Business Regulation Article, secs. 12-101 through 12-601).

LICENSURE OF SPORTS AGENTS

In 1988, the Secretary of Licensing and Regulation was authorized to license sports agents recruiting athletes in Maryland and to suspend or revoke such licenses after a hearing (Chapter 695, Acts of 1988). The statute imposes certain duties on sports agents regarding the filing of contracts, disclosure of fee schedules, contract cancellation, advertising, prohibited activities, and record keeping. Since 1995, the Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation has been responsible for these duties. (Code Business Regulation Article, secs. 4-401 through 4-426).


DIVISION OF RACING

500 North Calvert St.
Baltimore, MD 21201

The Division of Racing originated in 1980 as the Division of Sports and Recreation and reorganized under its present name in 1985. The Division of Racing oversees the work of the Maryland Racing Commission. The Maryland Racing Commission, through the Division of Racing, regulates thoroughbred and harness horse racing.

MARYLAND RACING COMMISSION

The Maryland Racing Commission formed in 1920 (Chapter 273, Acts of 1920). It licenses all persons, associations, or corporations that hold any horse racing meet within the State where racing is permitted for any stake, purse, or reward. The Commission makes all regulations governing the races. It may also regulate the size of a purse, the price of admission, or the charge made for any article or service sold at the meets. All persons engaged in racing in Maryland under assumed names must register with the Commission for permission to use such names. The Commission may revoke or suspend the license of any person or corporation engaged in racing within the State who violates the racing laws or Commission rules. For jockeys it licenses to ride thoroughbred horses, the Commission secures workers' compensation insurance coverage on a blanket basis.

The Commission's nine members are appointed to four-year terms by the Governor with Senate advice and consent. The Governor names the chair. The Secretary of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation appoints the Executive Director. Authorization for the Commission continues until July 1, 2011 (Code Business Regulation Article, secs. 11-201 through 11-214).

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 Maryland Manual On-Line, 2000

July 18, 2000   
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